“compelling was the chestnut-voiced baritone Andrew Garland as Prior, called upon to give the most emotionally taxing performance of the cast and serve as the drama’s moral center…beautiful dramatic performance.” — New York Classical Review

“A seasoned and communicative performer.”

“Three selections from Steven Mark Kohn’s American Folk Set brought Andrew Garland’s narrative gifts into ebullient focus.”

“Garland’s flexible vocal heft and proudly rolled “r”s brought vivid authority to excerpts from Vaughan Williams.” — ClassicalToday.com

“Baritone Andrew Garland, conveyance of authority, intelligence and emotional sensitivity was a constant pleasure. He alone clearly searched for something deeper than mere musicality.” — Boston Musical Intelligencer

 

“The performance featured a committed, talented cast. Andrew Garland’s Papageno was, in many ways, the heart of the performance; his comic energy and suavity made him a clear standout. He had the audience in the palm of his hand. His counterpart Papagena was a flirtatious Sara Heaton, and the two of them dazzled in their effervescent duet at the end of the opera.”  —Angelo Mao, Opera News

“Andrew Garland had the crowd in his hands as the bird-catcher Papageno, singing adroitly and delivering his spoken lines with a deadpan comic inflection that seemed at times to channel Owen Wilson.” – The Boston Globe

“Andrew Garland’s Papageno was endlessly amusing as a regular guy who wished he could catch a wife as easily as he caught birds, and who would evidently rather have been down the street at the Red Sox game than here amid thunderclaps, scary pursuers, and trials by fire. The singer’s bluff baritone showed an unexpectedly lyrical side in the philosophical duet with Pamina [Leah Partrige]” – See more at: http://bostonclassicalreview.com/2016/04/boston-baroques-magic-flute-delivers-mozart-with-bells-on/#sthash.nYr5zO6h.dpuf